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Author Topic: Save presets in a user-readable format?  (Read 3391 times)

mkoch

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Save presets in a user-readable format?
« on: May 24, 2020, 01:29:39 pm »
Hello,

is there any way to save a preset in a user-readable format?
For example *.txt or *.csv or *.json ?
Or is there a way to translate a *.mbprojz file into one of the above formats?
Or is it known how to decode the *.mbprojz file?

Thanks,
Michael

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Re: Save presets in a user-readable format?
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2020, 04:51:22 pm »
Rename *.mbprojz to *.zip and you'll find plain text serialized data inside the archive. Same for the *.mbpz files. The former is a "project" packing many patches together  and the latter is a single patch.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2020, 04:55:30 pm by DrJustice »

STM

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Re: Save presets in a user-readable format?
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2020, 07:54:47 pm »
Thanks! Good to know.
Now we only need a way to view, change and send this data to the MxB  ;)

mkoch

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Re: Save presets in a user-readable format?
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2020, 09:32:43 pm »
Rename *.mbprojz to *.zip and you'll find plain text serialized data inside the archive. Same for the *.mbpz files. The former is a "project" packing many patches together  and the latter is a single patch.

ok, that did work. But is it known which number is for which Parameter?

Michael

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Re: Save presets in a user-readable format?
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2020, 10:06:14 pm »
The format is not known.

Now, who's gonna be the first to reverse engineer it?  ;D

Not that it would be that useful...

mkoch

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Re: Save presets in a user-readable format?
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2020, 10:40:06 pm »
The format is not known.

Now, who's gonna be the first to reverse engineer it?  ;D

Not that it would be that useful...

In my opinion that would be very useful. I want to understand how a sound was created. Which potentiometers are used, and which are not used? I need about one hour to analyze a preset, if I write it all down by hand. It is frustrating to do this by hand if the same thing could be done by software in less than a second.

Michael

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Re: Save presets in a user-readable format?
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2020, 12:35:38 am »
In my opinion that would be very useful.
..
Of course. Sorry for generalizing.

I agree that being able to analyze patches is useful. My hope is still for a typical sysex protcol, documented and all, which would allow patch editing and transfers. Then we could get an editor going.

mkoch

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Re: Save presets in a user-readable format?
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2020, 09:47:46 am »
Is it normal that it takes about one minute to transfer all 256 patches? Is it possible to transfer only one patch from the MatrixBrute to the PC software?

Michael

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Re: Save presets in a user-readable format?
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2020, 12:21:36 pm »
You can drag a single matrix cell (patch) across and you can drag a single row (16 patches, just grab the letter of the row) across. That works both ways.

mkoch

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Re: Save presets in a user-readable format?
« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2020, 09:53:27 pm »
You can drag a single matrix cell (patch) across and you can drag a single row (16 patches, just grab the letter of the row) across. That works both ways.

Thank you, now I know how that works.

Michael

 

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